|
Return to the MLA Commons
An Evolving Anthology

Notes on Contributors

1 Leave a comment on paragraph 1 0 Matthias Bauer is professor of English literature at Tübingen University in Germany. He is the chair of the Graduate Research Training group Ambiguity: Production and Perception, funded by the German Research Foundation, and chairs (with the linguist Sigrid Beck) the project Interpretability in Context. In 2011, with Angelika Zirker, he initiated a peer-learning project (annotating-literature.org) for student annotation of texts. He is currently working on a research project titled “Theory and Practice of Literary Annotation in the Context of the Digital Humanities,” which is concerned with hermeneutics, empirical reader research, and digital knowledge media.

2 Leave a comment on paragraph 2 0 Tanya Clement is an assistant professor in the School of Information at the University of Texas, Austin. She has a PhD in English literature and language and an MFA in fiction. Her primary area of research centers on scholarly information infrastructure as it affects academic research, research libraries, and the creation of research tools and resources in the humanities.

3 Leave a comment on paragraph 3 0 Charles Cooney is a project coordinator at the ARTFL Project at the University of Chicago, where he earned a PhD in comparative literature. He has published research applying data-mining tools to historical and literary texts and has written on French and American avant-garde poetry.

4 Leave a comment on paragraph 4 0 Constance Crompton is an assistant professor of digital humanities and English in the Department of Critical Studies at the University of British Columbia. She is a digital humanist with research interests in scholarly editing, queer history, and Victorian popular and visual culture. She is director, with Michelle Schwartz, of Lesbian and Gay Liberation in Canada, an infrastructure pilot project of the Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory at the University of Alberta. She serves as an assistant director of the University of Victoria’s Digital Humanities Summer Institute and a research collaborator with Ryerson University’s Yellow Nineties Online.

5 Leave a comment on paragraph 5 0 Julia Flanders is the director of the Women Writers Project at Brown University. She is the editor (with Neil Fraistat) of the forthcoming Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship and has written articles and book chapters on various topics in digital humanities. Her research interests focus on scholarly uses of text encoding and data modeling and on changing methods of digital scholarly communication.

6 Leave a comment on paragraph 6 0 Gabriel Hankins is assistant professor of English at Clemson University, specializing in modernism and digital literary studies. He is currently project director for the Twentieth Century Literary Letters project, an international collaboration between scholars interested in the digital representation of literary correspondence. His current book projects concern the politics of modernism and of the digital humanities.

7 Leave a comment on paragraph 7 0 David L. Hoover is professor of English at New York University. He is the author of the forthcoming book Digital Literary Studies: Corpus Approaches to Poetry, Prose, and Drama (with Jonathan Culpepper and Kieran O’Halloran) and of Language and Style in The Inheritors and the editor (with Sharon Lattig) of Stylistics: Prospect and Retrospect. Hoover is writing a book-length study on how changes in the mode of composition affect literary style, looking at authors who changed temporarily or permanently from handwriting to dictation, from handwriting to typing, from word processing to computer dictation, and so forth.

8 Leave a comment on paragraph 8 0 William A. Kretzschmar, Jr., is the Harry and Jane Willson Professor in Humanities at the University of Georgia. His major publications include The Linguistic of Speech, the Oxford Dictionary of Pronunciation for Current English, Introduction to Quantitative Analysis of Linguistic Survey Data, and the Handbook of the Linguistic Atlas of the Middle and South Atlantic States. He is the editor of the American Linguistic Atlas Project, the oldest and largest national research project to survey how people speak differently in different parts of the country.

9 Leave a comment on paragraph 9 0 Alan Liu is professor in the English department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has published three books: Wordsworth: The Sense of History; The Laws of Cool: Knowledge Work and the Culture of Information; and Local Transcendence: Essays on Postmodern Historicism and the Database. Projects Liu has directed include the University of California Transliteracies Project on online reading and the software project RoSE: Research-Oriented Social Environment. Liu is coleader of the 4Humanities advocacy initiative and of the 4Humanities local chapter at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

10 Leave a comment on paragraph 10 0 Mark Olsen is the assistant director of the ARTFL Project at the University of Chicago. He received his PhD in French history from the University of Ottawa and has been involved in digital humanities and computer-aided text analysis for nearly three decades.

11 Leave a comment on paragraph 11 0 Daniel Powell is a doctoral student at the University of Victoria, where he also works in the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab. His research includes collaborative work on multimodal teaching and learning practices, the intersections of early modern textuality and digital methodologies, graduate training in the digital humanities, and humanities visualization. He is an editorial assistant for the journal Early Theatre: A Journal Associated with The Records of Early English Drama and is working on an article on textuality and Nicholas Udall’s comedy Ralph Roister Doister, as well as various projects in the digital humanities.

12 Leave a comment on paragraph 12 0 Kenneth M. Price is the Hillegass University Professor of Nineteenth-Century American Literature and codirector of the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. His most recent book, Leaves of Grass: The Sesquicentennial Essays, is edited with Ed Folsom and Susan Belasco. His other recent books include Re-scripting Walt Whitman: An Introduction to His Life and Work, written with Folsom, and To Walt Whitman, America. Since 1995, Price has served as codirector of The Walt Whitman Archive, an electronic research and teaching tool that sets out to make Whitman’s vast work accessible to scholars, students, and general readers. Price also codirects Civil War Washington, a project that examines the social, political, cultural, and medical-scientific transitions in the United States national capital provoked or accelerated by the Civil War.

13 Leave a comment on paragraph 13 0 Milena Radzikowska is an associate professor in information design at Mount Royal University. Her research areas include human-computer interaction (HCI), information design, usability, visual communication design, and digital humanities.

14 Leave a comment on paragraph 14 0 Glenn Roe is the Mellon fellow in digital humanities at the University of Oxford, a position he holds jointly with the Oxford e-Research Centre and the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages. Before his time at Oxford, he spent eight years as a senior project manager for the ARTFL Project at the University of Chicago, where he also received his PhD in French literature.

15 Leave a comment on paragraph 15 0 Stan Ruecker is an associate professor at the Illinois Institute of Technology’s Institute of Design. His current research interests are in the areas of humanities visualization, the future of reading, and information design.

16 Leave a comment on paragraph 16 0 Susan Schreibman is the Long Room Hub Assistant Professor in Digital Humanities at Trinity College Dublin, on the faculty of the School of English. She is the founding editor of The Thomas MacGreevy Archive, The Versioning Machine, and the Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative. Her publications include Collected Poems of Thomas MacGreevy: An Annotated Edition, A Companion to Digital Humanities, and A Companion to Digital Literary Studies.

17 Leave a comment on paragraph 17 0 Ray Siemens is Canada Research Chair in Humanities Computing and Distinguished Professor in the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Victoria, in English and computer science, and visiting Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Digital Humanities at King’s College London. He is founding editor of the electronic scholarly journal Early Modern Literary Studies, and his publications include Blackwell’s Companion to Digital Humanities (with Susan Schreibman and John Unsworth), Blackwell’s Companion to Digital Literary Studies (with Schreibman), and Mind Technologies: Humanities Computing and the Canadian Academic Community (with David Moorman). He directs the Digital Humanities Summer Institute and the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab and serves as vice president of the Canadian Federation of the Humanities and Social Sciences for Research Dissemination.

18 Leave a comment on paragraph 18 0 Stéfan Sinclair is an associate professor of digital humanities at McGill University. His research focuses on the design, development, usage, and theorization of text analysis and visualization tools for the digital humanities.

19 Leave a comment on paragraph 19 0 Angelika Zirker is assistant professor of English literature at Tübingen University in Germany. Her main research interests are in the early modern period and the literature and culture of the nineteenth century. In 2011, with Matthias Bauer, she initiated a peer-learning project (annotating-literature.org) for student annotation of texts. She is currently working on a research project titled “Theory and Practice of Literary Annotation in the Context of the Digital Humanities,” which is concerned with hermeneutics, empirical reader research, and digital knowledge media.

Page 15

Source: https://hcommons.org/notes-on-contributors/